Important Additions to NYC’s Fair Chance Act Limit Employers’ Ability to Perform Background Checks

Q: What do I need to know about the recent additions to New York City’s law about the use of criminal history in employment decisions?

A: While the New York City Fair Chance Act (“FCA”) has been in effect since October 2015, the New York City Commission on Human Rights (“Commission”) recently enacted final rules, which clarify many aspects of the law.  The final rules went into effect on August 5, 2017.

The key provision of the FCA prohibits employers from inquiring about an applicant’s criminal history until after a conditional offer of employment has been made. The final rules explain the meaning of a conditional offer, and clarify the steps an employer must take before revoking a conditional offer or taking an adverse employment action.

A conditional offer is defined as an offer of employment, promotion, or transfer. It is essential for employers and all relevant decision makers to understand that the FCA’s provisions cover far more than just an initial offer of employment – they also cover promotions and transfers.  The FCA provides that a conditional offer can only be revoked based on one of the following:

  • The results of a criminal background check (in which case the “Fair Chance Process” must be followed); or
  • The results of a medical exam, as permitted by the American with Disabilities Act; or

Other material information the employer could not have reasonably known before making the conditional offer if, based on the material information, the employer would not have made the offer.If an employer wishes to rescind a conditional offer based on a criminal background check, the employer must follow the “Fair Chance Process,” which is described in section 8-107(11-a) of the New York City Administrative Code. This includes providing the applicant with a copy of the background check report and an analysis of the factors that went into the decision (the list of acceptable factors is in Article 23-A of the New York State Correction Law), and allowing the applicant to address the criminal history at issue before the offer is rescinded. A sample notice approved by the Commission is available here:

http://www1.nyc.gov/assets/cchr/downloads/pdf/FairChance_Form23-A_distributed.pdf.

The final rules also added a number of per se violations. Engaging in such action is considered a violation regardless of whether the employer takes an adverse action against an employee. Fines for per se violations range from $500 to $10,000, depending on the facts and whether the employer has previous FCA violations. Per se violations include making any inquiry or statement about an applicant’s criminal history before a conditional offer is made, and using applications that require applicants to consent to a background check and/or provide information about criminal history. The use of such applications is a violation even if the application contains a disclaimer that states New York City applicants should not answer certain questions. This prohibition is quite unusual and runs counter to many employers’ practices of using nationwide or multi-state employment applications.To ensure FCA compliance, employers should review their existing policies and practices, and ensure key personnel are up to date with the FCA requirements. Employers should consult a labor and employment law attorney with any questions.

— Jessica Rothenberg