New Maryland Law Requires Employers to Gather Information on Settlement of Sex Harassment Claims

Q.  Are there any laws related to settlement of sex harassment claims in Maryland that I should be aware of?

A.  In response to the many high-profile scandals in the news, several jurisdictions have enacted anti-sexual harassment legislation. To date, Vermont, New York, and Washington passed anti-sexual harassment laws. Maine, North Carolina, Ohio, and New Jersey introduced similar statutes in state legislatures. The new legislation aims to reduce sexual harassment in the workplace by prohibiting waiver provisions in employment contracts, preventing non-disclosure and other provisions in sexual harassment settlement agreements, and providing new avenues for employee reporting and disclosure. Maryland is the latest state to say “#MeToo.”

On May 15, 2018, Maryland Governor Larry Hogan signed into the law the Disclosing Sexual Harassment in the Workplace Act of 2018 (the “Act”). Designed for transparency, the Act prohibits jury trial waivers and also imposes reporting requirements related to settlement of sexual harassment claims by Maryland employers.  Unlike many of the other laws, the Maryland law does not expressly prohibit nondisclosure provisions in settlement agreements.

The Act takes effect October 1, 2018.

Prohibition on Waivers

The Act prohibits Maryland employers, regardless of size, from requiring employees to arbitrate sexual harassment claims. The Act renders mandatory arbitration provisions as void against public policy. In addition, the Act prohibits an employer from taking any adverse action against an employee because the employee refuses to enter into any agreement containing an invalid waiver.

As we have written previously, mandatory arbitration provisions are favored under the Federal Arbitration Act, despite state law to the contrary. In fact, in a recent United States Supreme Court opinion, Epic Systems Corp. v. Lewis, the Court confirmed previous rulings in favor of mandatory arbitration of employment claims, upholding the validity of class action waivers in arbitration agreements signed by employees.  It is therefore likely that the prohibition on mandatory arbitration clauses will be attacked on the grounds that it is preempted by federal law. Similar state statutory provisions prohibiting mandatory arbitration have been found to be preempted.

Reporting Requirement

The Act also requires Maryland employers with 50 or more employees to submit a survey to the Maryland Commission on Civil Rights containing the following information:

  1. the number of settlements made by or on behalf of the employer after an allegation of sexual harassment by an employee;
  2. the number of times the employer has paid a settlement to resolve a sexual harassment allegation against the same employee over the past 10 years of employment;
  3. the number of settlements made after an allegation of sexual harassment that included a confidentiality provision; and
  4. information on whether the employer took any personnel action against the employee who was the subject of the settlement.

Employers must submit the first survey on or before July 1, 2020 and a second survey on or before July 1, 2022. The Commission will collect the employer-provided data and publish aggregate data on its publicly-accessible website, as well as provide, upon request, responses of individual employers to requirement number. 2.

Employer Action Items

With respect to the waiver prohibition aspect of the new Act, Maryland employers will have to decide whether to remove any provisions in employment agreements mandating arbitration of harassment claims, or take the position that the Maryland Act is preempted by federal law.

In addition, Maryland employers with 50 or more employees should prepare to comply with the survey requirements of the Act by coming up with a method to track and gather internal information on sexual harassment claims and settlements, as well as ensure that personnel files of the subjects of those sexual harassment claims are retained in order to complete the Commission survey.

Employers also should monitor for any future regulations or other guidance issued by the Commission that clarifies the Act’s employer reporting provision. For example, the Act does not address if the survey includes current and former employees and settlements outside of Maryland. Nor does the Act provide for any penalties or enforcement mechanisms if an employer fails to comply with the mandatory reporting requirements.

— Tracey E. Diamond and Sara Mohammed, Law Clerk

 

Maryland Paid Sick Leave Law Now In Effect

Q: I have employees working in Maryland. What do I need to know and do in order to comply with Maryland’s new paid sick leave law?

 A: The Maryland Healthy Working Family Act (the “Act”) went into effect on February 11, 2018. In short, the Act requires employers with 15 or more employees working in Maryland to provide paid sick and “safe” leave for qualified employees. Employees eligible for paid leave are entitled to be paid at the same rate the employee normally earns. Employers with 14 or fewer employees are required to provide unpaid sick and safe leave. All covered employers with employees whose primary work location is in Maryland are required to provide earned leave, regardless of where the employer is located.

Employees may use earned “sick and safe” leave to treat their own mental or physical injury, illness, or condition; to obtain preventive medical care for themselves or their family member; to care for a family member’s physical injury, illness, or condition; for maternity or paternity leave; or if the absence from work is necessary due to domestic violence, sexual assault, or stalking committed against the employee or the employee’s family member, and the leave is being used by the employee or employee’s family member to obtain certain services offered to victims of domestic violence, sexual assault, or stalking.

Under the Act, employees are able to accrue one hour of leave for every 30 hours that an employee works. An employee is entitled to accrue up to 40 hours of sick and safe leave in a year, regardless of the number of hours worked. Rather than awarding leave as it accrues throughout the year, an employer is permitted to “frontload” and award the full 40 hours of earned sick and safe leave that the employee would earn over the course of the year at the beginning of the year. Further, an employee is entitled to carry over earned but unused sick and safe leave from one year to the next, up to a maximum of 64 total hours. Of course, employers may allow employees to accrue more than 40 hours of leave in a year. There is no requirement for an employer to compensate employees for unused earned sick and safe leave when an employee leaves the employer’s employment.

Not all employees are covered under the Act. For example, employees working less than 12 hours a week and individuals under the age of 18 are exempt from the Act. There is also a carve-out for construction industry employees if an employee is covered by a bona fide collective bargaining agreement in which the requirements of the Act are clearly and expressly waived.

Employers are not required to modify existing paid leave policies if the existing policy allows employees to accrue and use leave under terms and conditions that are equal to the leave provided for under the Act. Employers also are required to provide notice of the Act’s requirements by posting information about the new law. Employers can meet this requirement by posting the Employee Notice found here. Additionally, employers may still require employees using sick and safe leave to comply with the employer’s regular notice and procedural requirements.

The Maryland Healthy Working Family Act is a complex law with multiple facets, including recordkeeping and tracking requirements. For further information regarding the Maryland Healthy Working Family Act or for assistance in developing policies compliant with Maryland law, contact any member of the Pepper Hamilton labor and employment team.

Lee E. Tankle