New York City Employers will be Subject to a New Accommodation Law Effective October 2018

Q: I am a New York City employer.  What do I need to know about the amendments to the law regarding accommodations?

A: Effective October 15, 2018, employers in New York City will be required to engage in a “cooperative dialogue” with a person who has requested accommodation or who the employer has notice may require an accommodation.  This new requirement stems from an amendment to the New York City Human Rights Law (“NYCHRL”).

While most employers are under an existing duty under the Americans with Disabilities Act (“ADA”) to engage in an interactive process with employees about accommodations, the expansion of the NYCHRL affects NYC employers in two key ways. First, the ADA applies to employers with 15 or more employees.  The NYCHRL has broader coverage, applying to employers with 4 or more employees.  Second, the NYCHRL amendments greatly expand the duty to engage in a cooperative dialogue beyond disability-related accommodations.

Employers will be required to engage in a cooperative dialogue for accommodations relating to: (1) disability; (2) religious needs; (3) pregnancy, childbirth, or a related medical condition; and (4) a person’s status as a victim of domestic violence, sex offenses, or stalking.

“Cooperative dialogue” is defined as a good faith written or oral dialogue concerning the person’s accommodation needs, potential accommodations (including alternatives to a requested accommodation), and the difficulties that potential accommodations may pose for the employer. This is similar to the interactive process under the ADA, which generally requires employers to request information about limitations, identity the barriers to job performance, and explore types of accommodation.  However, unlike the ADA, the NYCHRL requires that once a final determination is reached, employers must document it in writing, regardless of whether or not the accommodation is approved.

To prepare for the new law, NYC employers should ensure that all managers and other employees who may deal with accommodations are aware of the new requirements. In particular, employers should emphasize that the requirement to engage in cooperative dialogue extends beyond disability-related accommodations.  Employers should also develop internal processes for accommodation requests, dialogues, and determinations, so that all requests are addressed in a timely manner and properly documented.

Jessica X.Y. Rothenberg